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Hangover Control: The Bytox patch

Posted on 30th December, by DrinkGal in Insider. 1 Comment

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With New Year’s eve nearly upon us, it sounded like a Christmas miracle in my inbox: a patch that you slap on prior to tying one on, so you may wake up the next day less bleary eyed and remorseful. No, it’s not Ortho-Evra, (although a case could be made for that) it’s Bytox, a patch that claims to not be a hangover cure, but a hangover preventor. Like an insurance policy for a night of drinking, it sells a night of all of the fun, none of the consequences. Provided your beer goggles don’t lead you into bed with a troll, that is. And at $2.99, we imagine that frat boys are snapping these up faster than Trojans for the coming weekend.

Our first question, of course, is does it work? A quick Google search reveals that several folks out …


Champagne Cocktails!

Posted on 19th December, by DrinkGal in General. No Comments

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Years ago we heard a rumor that the original champagne glass, the coupe, was molded after narcissistic French Queen Marie Antoinette’s breast, so her admirers could drink to her health in them. While this story is a fun one to ponder at dinner parties or perhaps while preparing for the midnight ball drop , it is indeed false.

As New Year’s Eve is upon us again however, the subject of champagne is bound to come up. After all, it is the holiday where bubbly is king. The coupe, while certainly having the appearance of being modeled after a woman’s anatomy, was invented in 1663 by the English specifically for champagne, long after Marie Antoinette was a footnote in history. It has a tendency to encourage champagne to go flat rather quickly, which would explain the appearance of the champagne flute in …


History of: Beer

Posted on 13th December, by DrinkGal in History. No Comments

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Beer, like wine, is one of, if not THE oldest fermented beverages. Also like wine, no one is sure exactly when beer was “discovered” or “invented”, it just seems to have been around for as long as human beings have. Historians have estimated the roots of beer may go back as far as the early Neolithic or 9000 BC. Like wine, beer can be found in Egyptian and Mesopotamian writings. Some experts disagree about which came first, wine or beer, but it would seem that both are very, very old.

What beer has over wine is that it is the most widely consumed alcoholic beverage, and the third most popular drink behind water and tea. It is brewed all over the world, from the smallest brewery to several multinational companies. In 2006, 294.5 billion dollars were generated in the global economy …


History of: Bourbon

Posted on 13th December, by DrinkGal in History. No Comments

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Country of origin:
The good ‘ole United States

Why we love it:
Well, we used to drink Makers Mark and seven (sprite) almost exclusively. For the avoidance of public humiliation, this is no longer the case. We would like to point out though, that bourbon is still quite delicious. And who doesn’t love a Manhattan from time to time?

Where to find it (besides the liquor store):
Kentucky, USA. Bourbon can be made anywhere in the country, but there are only four distilleries that are not in Kentucky, and about a hundred that are, if that gives you an idea. Also, Kentucky is the only state that is allowed to put its name on the bottle.

What it’s made of:
Bourbon must be made from at least 51 percent corn, although most of them are more like 75%. The other percentage is made up of other grain …


History of: Brandy

Posted on 13th December, by DrinkGal in History. No Comments

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Country of origin:
The Netherlands! The Dutch are credited with the invention of Brandy in its modern form, even though Spain and Italy were making a version of it in the 13th century.

Why we love it:
Brandy is a derivative of wine, and it can be quite delicious. We not only enjoy the more traditional types of European brandy, but after a trip to Peru, love the Pisco something fierce as well.

Where to find it (besides the liquor store):
France, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, and even the good ole’ U.S. Grape brandies that are different from traditional brandies but still fall under the same umbrella can also be found in Mexico, Germany, Bulgaria, Georgia, Armenia, Moldova, Pakistan, Cyprus, Peru, Chile, Bolivia, and Greece.

What it’s made of:
Brandy is classified as a wine distillate in Europe, and brandy is by definition a spirit made from …


History of: Gin

Posted on 13th December, by DrinkGal in History. No Comments

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Country of origin:
Netherlands

Why we love it:
Dry gin martinis are, in our estimation, the best martinis out there. A little olive juice, shaken over ice… it is perfection.

Where to find it (besides the liquor store):
The most common type of gin is now London Dry Gin, from England. But the United States has taken up the mantle of gin production, as well as Spain, Holland, and even Germany. Currently, the United States is the largest gin producer.

What it’s made of:
Gin, in all it’s incarnations, is a juniper berry flavored spirit. Its made of a neutral grain spirit, with botanicals added in various ways after the first distillation. The myth that it’s made with juniper berries is false. However, it IS flavored with it, by a variety of methods.

Classifications:
Gin is not a heavily regulated product. In fact, there was a time (see: History) …


History of: Liqueurs

Posted on 13th December, by DrinkGal in History. No Comments

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Instead of going in depth about the origin of Liqueurs, we are instead going to give a brief history, and then list some of the more interesting and used liqueurs.The word liqueur comes from the Latin word liquifacere, which means “to dissolve.” Liqueurs follow the history of any liquor, and the word liqueur is used synonymously with cordial.  The first ones, like their cousins, were used as herbal tinctures and medicines. They are flavored with all types of things, like seeds, herbs, spices, flowers, fruit and cream. Usually they are on the sweeter side, and while they can be consumed straight up or on the rocks, more often than not they are used in the flavoring of cocktails.Generally, they are lower in alcohol content and high in sugar content. Loosely, they can be broken down into categories based on flavoring …


History of: Rum

Posted on 13th December, by DrinkGal in History. No Comments

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Country of origin:
Liquor lore insists that it is China or India, but the modern day spirit is from the Caribbean.

Why we love it:
Truth be told, we went to Puerto Rico and met a beautiful boy who was the son of the owner of Ron Del Barrilito. he has changed our perspective of rum, and Puerto Rican men, forever. That, and in 1942, a single barrel, which is stored in the “cellar”, was put aside with orders that it should only be opened when Puerto Rico becomes a free and independent nation. When and if that ever happens, the cask (barrel) will be brought to the town square in the center of Bayamon and its contents will be offered free to all those who wish to drink from it.

Where to find it (besides the liquor store):
Welcome to the Caribbean, love! The …


History of: Scotch

Posted on 12th December, by DrinkGal in History. No Comments

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Country of origin:
Scotland

Why we love it:
As with all whisk(e)y,We have a healthy appreciation for Scotch. It has a strong following, and we respect that greatly.

Where to find it (besides the liquor store):
Only in Scotland. Hence the name Scotch.

What it’s made of:
Grains: malted and unmalted barley, wheat, and corn.

Classifications:
Much of the classifications of Scotch are run parallel to Whiskey in general, as Scotch is a Whiskey.

Perhaps the best place to start is the word, whiskey. In Scotland, when referring to their “whiskey” they like to spell it “whisky”.  Perhaps this seems to be much ado about nothing. In truth, we have seen it used interchangeably on products made in Scotland and those made outside of it. Traditionally, whisky is Scotch and whiskey is Irish. Why the confusion? Can’t it be used interchangeably in any circumstance?

Here’s the deal. The Scots maintain that …


History of: Tequila

Posted on 11th December, by DrinkGal in History. 1 Comment

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Country of origin:
Mexico

Why we love it:
Because it’s delicious! Duh. Also, because it’s the nation’s fastest growing liquor. Since 2002, sales of premium and super premium tequila have been up 28 percent. Jump on the bandwagon, why don’t ya?

Where to find it (besides the liquor store):
Tequila, Mexico. Tequila is located in the western state of Jalisco, 40 miles northwest of Guadalajara.

What it’s made of:
Agave, or Agave Tequiliana Azul (Blue Agave), or Tequilana Weber, depending on whom you ask. For the purposes of this history, we are calling it just “agave”.

Classifications:
Tequila is regulated by the Tequila Regulatory Council of Mexico.

To make it easy, we will first split Tequila into two categories. 100% Blue Agave and Tequila Mixto. The only way you know for sure is to read the bottle. If it doesn’t say “100% Blue Agave”, then it’s the other stuff.

As the …